Laboratory of Nanobiotechnologies

Confocal microscope OLYMPUS FV3000
Category:
Microscopy
Applications:
in vitro
Rarity:
Sophisticated
Description

Confocal laser scanning microscopes are used for fluorescent observation*1 of fine structure and movements inside tissue or living cells. These microscopes obtain high-contrast three-dimensional images of microscopic structures inside cells by detecting the small amounts of fluorescent light emitted by a sample as it is scanned by a laser beam. Olympus markets its confocal laser scanning microscopes and multiphoton laser scanning microscopes*2 as the FLUOVIEW series.

The new FV3000 series is the successor to the FV1200. In addition to imaging reactions in cells at high speed and obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional images, the new models have high sensitivity and can capture light even from dim samples. They also support precision observation, including a highly efficient spectral detector that can discriminate fluorescence by wavelength as well as a timing management system that can reliably execute observation schedules that follow a variety of different applications. These features provide faster and more accurate imaging of movements inside tissues or living cells, giving the microscopes a role at the leading edge of research in such fields as the study of cancer biology or industrial and research utility for the development of iPS and other pluripotent cells.

Confocal microscope OLYMPUS FV3000
Category:
Microscopy
Applications:
in vitro
Rarity:
Sophisticated
Description

Confocal laser scanning microscopes are used for fluorescent observation*1 of fine structure and movements inside tissue or living cells. These microscopes obtain high-contrast three-dimensional images of microscopic structures inside cells by detecting the small amounts of fluorescent light emitted by a sample as it is scanned by a laser beam. Olympus markets its confocal laser scanning microscopes and multiphoton laser scanning microscopes*2 as the FLUOVIEW series.

The new FV3000 series is the successor to the FV1200. In addition to imaging reactions in cells at high speed and obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional images, the new models have high sensitivity and can capture light even from dim samples. They also support precision observation, including a highly efficient spectral detector that can discriminate fluorescence by wavelength as well as a timing management system that can reliably execute observation schedules that follow a variety of different applications. These features provide faster and more accurate imaging of movements inside tissues or living cells, giving the microscopes a role at the leading edge of research in such fields as the study of cancer biology or industrial and research utility for the development of iPS and other pluripotent cells.